How to Change the Keyboard Design on a Galaxy S III

by Dan Stone

    The Samsung Galaxy S III's digital keyboard can be swapped out for another one that changes the design. Samsung features two built-in digital keyboards, the "Samsung" keyboard and "Swype" keyboard, which can be swapped in the device settings. However, if the two built-in keyboards aren't working for you or you just want to try something different, you can install a third-party keyboard app through the Google Play store. Android OS itself is customizable, meaning most of the interface features can be customized through apps.

    Step 1

    Download and install from the Google Play store any third-party keyboard apps you want to use.

    Step 2

    Return to the Android Home Screen by pressing the "Home" or center button once.

    Step 3

    Tap the "Menu" key and select the "Settings" option.

    Step 4

    Scroll down to the "Personal" meu section and touch the "Language and input" option.

    Step 5

    Tap the right-pointing arrow icon under the "Keyboards and input methods" heading to open the keyboard selector.

    Step 6

    Tap the alternative keyboard you want to use on the "Choose input method" pop-up prompt to enable the custom keyboard.

    Step 7

    Activate a mode of text entry or open the custom keyboard app to bring up the configuration menu. Follow the onscreen instructions to configure the app's appearance and features options.

    Tips

    • The Galaxy S III can support multiple keyboards at once, so you don't have to uninstall or remove a previous keyboard to add a new one. The old keyboard will still be there if you decide the new one isn't any better. Custom keyboards adjust the visual design and can add different types of predictive text systems and alternative modes of entry like using sliding motions instead of taps alone to type.
    • Among premium selections, SwiftKey Keyboard offers several visual skins to mix up the appearance and adds sliding-input functionality. A.I.type Keyboard Plus also features multiple visual skins and adds shortcut buttons. The Minuum Keyboard doesn't offer skin customization, but it adds an alternative keyboard that can minimize down to a single row of functional keys that leaves as much of the screen as possible still exposed when entering text.
    • Among free choices, the Google keyboard offers a single visual variation on the keyboard and functions similar to the default keyboard. Google keyboard is the stock version of the Android keyboard found on other Android devices. TouchPal Keyboard adds swipe-input functionality and several different visual skins to mix up the appearance. Siine Shortcut Keyboard adds a few keyboard color variations, but emphasizes the ability to cross-app-integrate through shortcuts, letting you do things like access your calendar app from the text-entry screen.

    Warning

    • Designing your own custom keyboard requires programming an app; this level of customization is not available on the Galaxy S III without being able to program. Additionally, some third-party keyboard apps are free, but many carry a premium cost. The alternative keyboard won't interfere with the keyboard setup process as it's performed entirely without text entry.

    About the Author

    Dan Stone started writing professionally in 2006, specializing in education, technology and music. He is a web developer for a communications company and previously worked in television. Stone received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and a Master of Arts in communication studies from Northern Illinois University.

    Photo Credits

    • Neilson Barnard/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images