How to Cook a Choice Boneless Texas Broil Fast

by Diane Watkins Google

    Texas broil steak is a less tender cut of beef that benefits from proper preparation and slicing. Many cooks feel the meat benefits from a good marinade, but a fast cooking method followed by proper cutting also yields a tender steak. The secret to fast cooking is to have the pan or broiler hot before adding the steak. If it is not hot enough, the steak will give up its juices and stew in them.

    Preparing the Steak

    If you choose to marinate, use your favorite steak marinade recipe and allow one to 24 hours marinating time. Marinating tenderizes the meat before cooking, but be careful -- long exposure to marinade breaks down the meat fibers and ruins the texture of the meat.

    Take the steak out of the refrigerator about 30 minutes before cooking and allow the meat to warm to near room temperature. If you marinated the steak, dry it with a clean towel before cooking and discard the marinade. If not, season it with your favorite steak seasoning, a Cajun seasoning blend, a dry ranch seasoning mix, or sprinkle it with salt, pepper and garlic powder. Brush the steak with a thin film vegetable oil.

    Cook Fast in the Broiler

    Preheat the broiler and place the Texas broil steak on a broiler pan on the top rack of the oven. Leave the oven door cracked open to allow smoke to escape and turn on your overhead fan. Broil the steak for three to five minutes on each side until done to your liking. Use a meat thermometer to be sure the internal temperature rises above 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Cook Fast in a Grill Pan

    If you have a grill pan, use it to cook your Texas broil steak. Heat the grill pan over medium-high heat. Place the steak in the hot pan and cook for three to four minutes, until the bottom is beginning to brown or has brown grill marks. Turn the steak over using tongs and finish cooking on the other side. Cook the steak until the internal temperature is at least 145 degrees F.

    Serving

    The success of your Texas broil steak relies as much on what you do after it is cooked as it does on the cooking method. Allow the steak to rest for at least five minutes before slicing. Slice the meat on a bias, against the grain, for tenderness. The muscle fibers are long and chewy. Slicing against the grain cuts through the chewy fibers and makes the steak more tender.

    About the Author

    Diane Watkins has been writing since 1984, with experience in newspaper, newsletter and Web content. She writes two electronic newsletters and has a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Clemson University. She has taken graduate courses in biochemistry and education.

    Photo Credits

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