Data Entry Job Interview Questions

by Kristine Tucker Google

    Interviewing for a data entry job, often known as a data entry keyer or data entry clerk position, can be a piece of cake as long as you are prepared to answer questions about your skills and experience. Data entry clerks operate equipment that allows them to quickly and effectively enter and save information on a computer, or other specialized recording device. Most data entry jobs require well-tuned fine-motor skills.

    The interviewer will ask questions about your experience with data-recording equipment. Depending on the company's needs, he might ask, "Do you know how to use a keyboard, optical scanner, computerized pricing equipment, keypad, data-entry calculator, hand-held medical data device or data recorder?" If you aren't experienced with the particular model, style or type of data-entry equipment the company uses, discuss your personal expertise with data-recording devices. The employer will likely train you on his equipment, so your previous knowledge and experience might be sufficient.

    Data entry is often performed on computers that use industry-specific software. The employer will likely ask, "Do you have experience using a variety of software programs?" or "What software do you know how to use?" Most employers train their keyers and clerks to use their computers and software, but it helps when a job applicant is already familiar with industry-relevant data-entry programs. For example, the hiring manager might ask if you are familiar with accounting software if the bulk of your work will be reporting financial transactions.

    Data entry jobs usually require speed and accuracy, so the interviewer will likely ask, "How many words can you type a minute?" In some professions, such as medical coding, the employer might ask about your accuracy and approval ratings. Some data entry positions might require a typing test to determine whether your speed and accuracy meet minimum guidelines. When you confirm the interview, ask the hiring manager if you will be required to take a typing or data entry test? You can practice your skills beforehand, if one is required.

    Some data entry keyers, clerks and managers enter and record sensitive information. The data might include personal or private financial or medical information about clients, patients, employees or common citizens. Some information might relate to a company's financial status, revenue, debt or tax obligations. The interviewer might ask, "Are you willing to keep the information you record private?" or, "Are you willing to take a background check?" The hiring manager might ask for personal and professional references who can vouch for your character and verify your ability to maintain confidentiality.

    About the Author

    Kristine Tucker has been writing articles on finance, politics, humanities and interior design since 2001. Her articles have been featured in many online publications. Tucker's experience as an English teacher has given her the opportunity to read many wonderful masterpieces. She holds a degree in political science with a minor in international studies.

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