Easy Jobs That Make a Lot of Money

by Brian Hill

    Easy jobs are those that don't take a lot of effort. The trick is what's easy for 1 person is a challenge for another. For example, a professional golfer would consider it easy to have a score less than 80, while an avid amateur may never get his score below 90. The same question arises with defining what's a lot of money. A waitress may think $200 a night in tips is a lot of money, while attorneys make at least that much an hour.

    Hit the bestselling list and you'll make a lot of money. Nicholas Sparks received a $1,000,000 advance for his first novel "The Notebook." J. K. Rowling, the author of the vastly successful Harry Potter series, was an unemployed mum when her first book was published. Dan Brown has sold 200 million copies of his books. James Patterson teams up with co-authors so he can produce more books under his name than he could writing on his own. It might seem overwhelming to write a 90,000 word book, but if you break it into sections of 1,000 words a day you're finished in 3 months. That means you can take the rest of the year off. Now that's easy.

    Whether it's stand up comedian, rock star, singer or actor, the pay is good and the work easy because they love to perform. For example, an actor who makes 1 movie a year could take away several million dollars for a few weeks' work. If you're lucky enough to be on "Dancing with The Stars," you make $125,000 for the first 2 episodes and then hefty bonuses ranging from $10,000 to $50,000 for each week you stay on the program. That's a nice chunk of change for 8 weeks of work. Not much could be easier than being yourself. That's what celebrities like the Kardashians do and they make major money.

    If you spend any time at all on the Internet you've probably read the sales pitch for money-making products and services that tell you how your bank account will be stuffed with $100 bills while you lay on the beach getting a suntan. The people who come up with those products make the easy money. You don't.

    Tim Ferris, the author of "The Four Hour Work Week," is a huge proponent of outsourcing every function possible to cheap overseas labor. That way you work as little as possible while still raking in stacks of cash. He advises spending those 4 hours in creating the ideas behind new products, software, services and hiring someone else do the actual development.

    Major events like the Super Bowl, the World Series, the Olympics, and major golf tournaments bring in lots of visitors. Those visitors have to stay someplace. Consider renting your home while you stay with friends, go camping or rent a motel room in another city. Turn it into a business by soliciting neighbors to rent their homes and charging them a fee to find the guests. The only work you have to do is advertise to find the guests. If you own a home near a sports stadium, rent out your driveway as a parking spot during the games.

    Buy low and sell high is an old axiom referring to the stock market. However, it works in other areas as well. The secret is to have to have a lot of knowledge about what you're flipping, the market and customers. For example, websites can be flipped for as little as $10 or $20 or as much as several thousand, depending on the niche and domain name.

    About the Author

    Brian Hill is the author of four popular business and finance books: "The Making of a Bestseller," "Inside Secrets to Venture Capital," "Attracting Capital from Angels" and his latest book, published in 2013, "The Pocket Small Business Owner's Guide to Business Plans."

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