What to Expect on a Second Interview for an Accounting Job

by Kristin Swain

    After successfully navigating an initial interview you may get called back for the second round accounting interview. The first interview might have tested you on the basics and questioned you on your math, accounting and review abilities. Consider the first interview as an overview of the position and your applicable accounting experience. Expect the second interview to delve more deeply into your technical skills, general accounting knowledge and suitability for the position.

    You may meet with previous interviewers during your second interviewer, and you will also likely meet company managers and your potential boss. They will probably have specific questions about your accounting accomplishments and skills. Expect to provide quantifiable information about your skills, such as how many accounts payable invoices you can process in one day, the size of the companies for which you've processed payroll or how much money you recovered from auditing accounts. Some companies may have a single second interview with one company representative while others may require several interviews with different company representatives throughout the day.

    Personal evaluation is a large part of the second interview. Hiring managers will search for any inconsistencies between your resume and performance. Be prepared for questions that test your knowledge, thought processes and technical accounting skills. In a second accounting interview, the company may be focused on what you can bring to the organization. Be prepared to answer questions about your goals for the position and for the accounting department. The first interview should give you an overview of what the company is expecting from a new hire; you should show how you'll meet those goals in the second interview.

    The second interview is your chance to evaluate the company as much as they're evaluating you. During this interview you should be able to determine whether or not you want to be an accountant for this company. Don't be afraid to ask questions. If you don't know what the company's goals are for the position, find out. Learn what the specific responsibilities of the position are, if you would be managing a team of accountants, if you'd be required to complete end of month closings or process in house payroll. Ask if you are required to complete any continued or special training, such as learning any specialized accounting software or attending conferences. You may also want to learn what the corporate structure is from the perspective of the accounting department.

    You should have a lot of information about the position and the company before you leave the second interview. Find out when you can expect a decision to be made. You want the interviewers to know you are interested in the position and that you can meet or exceed the needs of their accounting department. Interviewers often ask if there is anything else they should know about you. Take that opportunity to relate anything you haven't had the chance to share such as training, education or professional accomplishments that make you a better candidate.

    About the Author

    Residing in Los Angeles, Kristin Swain has been a professional writer since 2008. Her experience includes finance, travel, marketing and television. Swain holds a Bachelor of Arts in communication from Georgia State University.

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