How to Do a Flyer for a Meeting

by Oubria Tronshaw

    The five Ws (who, what, when, where and why) are more than questions asked by nosy neighbors or aspiring journalists -- they’re also guideposts to explaining how to structure your meeting flyer. As you arrange the information on the page, center the answer to your most important W -- typically “Why?” -- in the biggest, boldest font. Only add colors and graphics if they enhance rather than the detract from the readability of the flyer. For your message to be effective, it must be simple and clear.

    Begin your flyer with a tagline that explains the point of the meeting. This could be anything from a question to a simple announcement, such as “Want to fight injustice?” or a more straightforward “Senior Trip Meeting.” Center your tagline on the page in large, bold font so that it attracts the attention of your intended audience.

    Underneath your tagline, include a brief summary of who’s hosting the meeting and what will be discussed. For example, “The Association for Student Equality will talk about how to fight injustice on this campus and how to make the voices of minority students better heard,” or simply, “Hosted by the Office of Extracurricular Affairs.” If you’re holding a meeting as a platform for a guest speaker, make sure to include his or her name, credentials and topic.

    The day, date and time of the meeting should be clearly printed beneath the description. For example, “Monday, June 18, 2013, 6 p.m.” If possible, include the tentative end of the meeting as well, so attendees know how much time to allot in their schedules.

    The location of the meeting should follow. Include the address as well as any room or suite numbers, and directions, if necessary. For example, 121 Broad Street, Suite 711, next door to the administration building.

    Depending on the purpose of your meeting, you may need attendees to follow special instructions. State this information toward the end of the page: for example, “Seating is limited; please arrive 15 minutes early,” or “Please bring your cap and gown for fitting,” or “Wear comfortable clothing, as we will practice breathing and meditation techniques.”

    At the bottom of the flyer, mention any perks offered at the meeting. Examples include “Refreshments will be served” or “Live music and dancing afterward” or “Book signing and meet and greet after the meeting.”

    About the Author

    Oubria Tronshaw specializes in topics related to education, relationships, home-and-garden, business, hair care and parenting. She received her B.A. in creative writing from the Santa Fe University of Art and Design in 2006 and is currently earning an M.F.A.

    Photo Credits

    • Oli Scarff/Getty Images News/Getty Images