How to Freeze & Keep Moist Pork Chops

by Diane Watkins Google

    Pork chops are a kid-friendly dinner option, as long as you prepare them properly. Your kids will turn up their noses at dry, tough chops. Pork chops have a large cut surface area, making them vulnerable to drying caused by freezer burn. Cycles of freezing and thawing makes the problem worse, so purchase your pork chops fresh and cook or freeze them as soon as possible for best quality. For the safety of your loved ones, thaw frozen pork chops in the refrigerator before use.

    Items you will need

    • Sandwich-size plastic bags
    • Freezer bags or freezer paper
    • Plastic container

    Freezing Raw Pork Chops

    Step 1

    Wrap each pork chop individually in foil or plastic wrap. Or seal in individual plastic bags, expressing as much air as possible, to make it easy to separate chops while frozen for quick thawing.

    Step 2

    Place the individually wrapped chops in a larger freezer bag or wrap in freezer paper. Squeeze out the excess air and seal tight.

    Step 3

    Label the wrapped pork chops, including the freezer date. Store for up to six months in the freezer.

    Freezing Cooked Pork Chops

    Step 1

    Cool cooked pork chops not prepared with a sauce, such as chops prepared with a ranch seasoning, in the refrigerator before wrapping for freezer storage. Wrap and freeze cooked pork chops individually, in the same way that you wrap raw pork chops.

    Step 2

    Place chops that are cooked in a sauce or gravy in the smallest-sized plastic container that holds a serving for your family. Cover the chops completely with sauce and seal the container.

    Step 3

    Label the pork chops with a marker, including the ingredients, heating instructions and the date frozen. Use within two to three months, reheating to at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit before use.

    About the Author

    Diane Watkins has been writing since 1984, with experience in newspaper, newsletter and Web content. She writes two electronic newsletters and has a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Clemson University. She has taken graduate courses in biochemistry and education.

    Photo Credits

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