Menu Plans for Fruitarians

by Sally Murphy

    Fruitarianism is a diet based around fruits, with some vegetables, nuts, seeds and grains allowed. A strictly fruitarian diet is usually not healthy for younger children, since kids need many different nutrients as they grow. However, older children and adults often enjoy a diet based on a tasty, colorful variety of fruits. With some creativity, you'll be able to plan convenient fruitarian meals for breakfast, lunch, snacks, and dinner.

    Breakfast

    For a quick, delicious breakfast, blend together fresh fruit with a drop of a natural sweetener such as honey or molasses. For instance, blend bananas, oranges and apples together and sprinkle chopped nuts on the finished smoothie. Traditional breakfast fruits such as melon slices or grapefruit halves are suitable for a fruitarian breakfast, served alongside a slice of avocado or a handful of hazelnuts and pumpkin seeds. Nuts and seeds balance out your fruit breakfast for sustained energy.

    Lunch

    Many vegetables also count as fruits on the fruitarian diet. Make a savory salad for your lunch, with olives, tomatoes, cucumber and sunflower seeds mixed together and seasoned with freshly squeezed lemon juice. For extra iron and fiber, create a tomato and cucumber salad with kidney beans or black beans as the base. Round out your fruitarian lunch with your favorite fresh fruit, such as a handful of grapes, a ripe banana, or fresh apple.

    Dinner

    For your evening meal, serve generous portions of your favorite fruits and vegetables. Try a salad that includes both fruits and vegetables, such as chopped apples and pears mixed in with spinach and avocado. Serve glasses of freshly squeezed juice alongside your evening meal or serve side dishes of raw coconut slices or fresh berries. If you'd like to include some grain products with your dinner, consider polenta, a yellow corn grain. Heat the polenta into a small pancake shape and top it with chopped tomatoes and fresh garlic.

    Snacks

    Even if your young child isn't following a strict fruitarian diet, fresh fruit makes an easy and nutritious snack. If your children dislike certain fruits, experiment with new fruits until you find a kind that they enjoy. For instance, try kiwis or papaya. Slice up apples and add a dab of peanut butter for a traditional snack that meets fruitarian requirements. Mix dried fruits with raw nuts, such as cashew nuts or pecans, for a convenient fruitarian trail mix.

    About the Author

    Sally Murphy began writing professionally in 2000. She has worked as a writing instructor and written for various organizations and publications on topics ranging from history to hairstyles to television shows. Murphy graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in English and also holds a Master of Fine Arts in writing.

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