Mistletoe Crafts for Kids

by Susan Revermann Google

    Mistletoe doesn’t have to be only for adults -- kids can get in on the action, too. The tradition of hanging mistletoe is commonly linked with kissing, but it is also associated with love, friendship, good luck and health. Whether the festive craft is tasty, silly, memorable or just added for a nice touch, your child is sure to get into the holiday spirit.

    The mistletoe tradition never tasted so good. Mix up a batch of sugar cookie dough with your child and roll it out so it is about one-quarter inch thick. Hand him a butter knife and ask him to cut the dough to look like a mistletoe cluster. The leaves resemble fresh sage leaves or elongated ovals. Offer a picture of the plant as a guide, if needed. Transfer the cookie masterpiece to the baking sheet via a pancake flipper and bake the dough according to the cookie recipe. While the cookies are in the oven, mix up some powdered sugar frosting and add a drop of green food coloring to it. Once the cookies are out of the oven and cooled, use a pastry brush to spread the frosting on the cookies. Add edible pearl candy for the mistletoe berries that you can find in the baking isle. Once the frosting has set, the cookies are ready to serve.

    Your child can put his best foot forward with this keepsake mistletoe craft. Trace your kiddo’s foot about five or six times on green construction paper and cut out the footprints. He can squeeze some glue on the paper and sprinkle on some glitter. Once the gooey stuff is dry, connect them together with some green pipe cleaners and move the parts around until it resembles a mistletoe branch. Grab some white pony beads and stick them on one end of the pipe cleaners. Write his name and the date on one of the footprint cutouts as a reference.

    A mistletoe gift accent won’t steal the gift’s spotlight, but it sure does add a nice festive touch. Have your child cut several mistletoe leaf shapes out of a green foam sheet, felt or nice scrapbooking paper. Grab some green pipe cleaners or floral wire. Puncture one end of the leaf shapes with the pipe cleaners or wires and push the leaves down a bit. Place four leaves on each pipe cleaner or wire, positioning them in opposing pairs on the material, with each pair about an inch away from the next pair. On the ends of the wires or pipe cleaners, push one to three round pearl beads. Collect the mistletoe leaves and stems together to make a branch and secure them together with a fancy red ribbon. To attach it to the gift, use ribbon and place the gift label on or next to it.

    To add a silly and fun spin the mistletoe tradition, your child can make a dangling mistletoe headband. Find a regular plastic headband, a green wire or pipe cleaner, a small bunch of mistletoe and a red ribbon. Twist one end of the wire or pipe cleaner to the middle of the headband so when the child puts the headband on, it should point straight up from the top of the head. Twist the other end of the wire or pipe cleaner around the base of the mistletoe a couple of times to secure it into place. Tie the ribbon into a bow at the base of the mistletoe as a nice accent. Curled ribbon also looks good here. Bend the wire or pipe cleaner slightly so it arches forward. Now your kid can try it on. Give him a kiss to show him it works.

    About the Author

    Susan Revermann is a professional writer with educational and professional experience in psychology, research and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington in psychology, focused on research, motivational behavior and statistics. Revermann also has a background in art, crafts, green living, outdoor activities and overall fitness, balance and well-being.

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