How to Play Moon Ball With Kids

by Jill Kokemuller

    Moon ball is a simple game with one goal -- keep the ball in the air -- but it provides many beneficial lessons for participants. Moon ball can be played by large or small groups. Playing the game teaches children how to work as a team, helps improve hand-eye coordination, provides healthy exercise disguised as "fun" and gives younger children an opportunity to practice their counting skills. Because moon ball is not a contact sport and does not require any special skills, it can be played children and adults of all ages, so everyone in the group is included.

    Items you will need

    • 16-inch lightweight ball
    Step 1

    Spread the kids out over the game area. They will be moving around some in order to hit the ball as it falls.

    Step 2

    Explain the object of the game. The goal is to keep the ball from touching the ground for as long as possible. The kids are not supposed to catch the ball. Instead, they must hit it back up into the air. The same person can't hit the ball two times in a row.

    Step 3

    Toss the ball over the group to begin the game. Each time the ball is hit, the group shouts out the number to keep track of how many long they are able to keep the ball in play.

    Step 4

    End the game or begin a new game when the ball hits the ground.

    Tips

    • If the children are too young to count, they can have fun just hitting the ball, or you can play timed games.
    • Vary the game by having each person in the group hit the ball once before anyone can hit it a second time.
    • If your group is large, you can split it into teams each with their own ball. Make it a contest to see which team can keep the ball in play the longest.

    Warnings

    • Do not use hard balls such as basketballs or soccer balls because they can cause injury.
    • If you are indoors, always play in an open area with high ceilings.

    About the Author

    Jill Kokemuller has been writing since 2010, with work published in the "Daily Gate City." She spent six years working in a private boarding school, where her focus was English, algebra and geometry. Kokemuller is an authorized substitute teacher and holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Iowa.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images