Summer Chores for Kids

by Kathryn Rateliff Barr Google

    Summer chores keep your child busy, perhaps reducing the amount of trouble he can get into, and might increase your child’s pocket money so he can spend his own money instead of bugging you for some. Assigning chores might keep you from hiring someone else to do the word or doing it yourself.

    Little Ones

    Toddlers to kindergartners can help with simple chores such as walking and feeding the dog, sorting laundry and putting outside toys away. The child might enjoy a small garden plot where she can grow summer flowers or something for the dinner table. On a picnic, your little one can be in charge of straightening out the blanket and setting the table before lunch and rounding up the trash and depositing it in a trash container after the meal is done.

    Elementary

    Elementary school kids are responsible enough to take on more complex chores. Your child might clean up the yard once a week before the lawn is mowed or help drag the lawn sprinkler around so your grass doesn’t die in the summer heat. A summer garden keeps your child busy for an hour or two pulling weeds, watering, and bringing in the ripe produce so everyone can enjoy the fruits of his labor. He can go through his things and decide what needs to be passed down to a sibling, added to a family yard sale or given away.

    Tweens

    If you have younger children, your tween will be a big help keeping an eye on her siblings while you get your chores done. This might be a good time to teach her to do her own laundry and prepare food in the kitchen. Assign a few simple housekeeping duties such as vacuuming, dusting and organizing her room. She can help wash the windows and screens so you can open the windows when the weather is warm.

    Teens

    Teens can take on many of those tasks that need muscle and stamina, such as caring for the lawn, cleaning out the garage so you can get the car in, watering around your home’s foundation and helping with home maintenance tasks that you can’t get done in colder months. If you need a babysitter, your teen might fill the bill and appreciate the cash that comes with the chore. Summer is a good time for catching up on the car maintenance and your teen could profit from knowing how to check and fill the car fluids and learning simple car repair skills. Permission to use the car could accompany responsibilities to keep the car interior and exterior clean and ensure that the tank stays full.

    About the Author

    Rev. Kathryn Rateliff Barr has taught birth, parenting, vaccinations and alternative medicine classes since 1994. She is a pastoral family counselor and has parented birth, step, adopted and foster children. She holds bachelor's degrees in English and history from Centenary College of Louisiana. Studies include midwifery, naturopathy and other alternative therapies.

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